Story of Ethan, a Young Man with Autism Passing the Sacrament

The father of a Ethan, a young man with autism begins his story by recounting a visit from their bishop to discuss their son receiving the priesthood:

"Well, as we sat and discuss this for nearly an hour, Bishop Noble said (and I'm paraphrasing), "I think we should ordain Ethan. Not just for him, but for the ward. I think it would be a great thing for the ward to be able to see him passing the sacrament and experience him. In fact, I hope he does have a meltdown while passing the sacrament..."

"Are you kidding me!?!

"That's right,

"I hope he does have a meltdown while passing the sacrament."

"He went on to explain, that he thought it would be great for the members to witness first hand his special needs, as it would help them place their lives in perspective as to what is truly important. He also thought it would create a greater bond between Ethan and the ward members as he served them by giving them the sacrament."

He then goes on to explain some of the experiences they have had with Ethan passing the sacrament. They have had him...

...wander off while passing the trays to give a hug to a dear friend,

...pat kids no the head as he passes to their row of pews,

...pick his nose,

...wave to people across the chapel that he recognizes,

...seen him get frustrated when little kids don't put the water cup in the tray when they are finished,

...reach down the back of his pants, clear to his elbow, because something on his shirt tail was bothering him,

...throw a leg up on the arm of the pew, like he's a cowboy sitting on a corral fence, waiting for the members in the the pew to return the tray,

..drink all the remaining cups of water out of his tray before he returns it,

...we thought we had seen it all.

Not until today!

He then goes into an especially challenging day of Ethan passing the sacrament and the reactions of ward members, the full article is a great read.

Read "Be careful what you hope for . . ."

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